House of Lords Sides with Google

Posted on July 31, 2014 by - Uncategorized

Just when it seemed like all of Europe was on the same page, a wrench was thrown into the plan. It all revolves around the “right to be forgotten.” Let’s back up.

House of Lords still thinks it's 1684.

House of Lords still thinks it’s 1684.

Residents in Germany and Belgium (among other places) have filed lawsuits over the past decade concerning what appears on search as it relates to their public image and profile. In some cases the images that showed up were of the wrong person, insinuated certain things that weren’t true and/or they actually happened, but the individual wanted to be able to move on in their life, but can’t (they argue) because of the content that appears online through the Google search engine.

Now, we are not here to debate the rulings. They happened. The European courts decided time and time again that Google needs to remove the old images if the person submits a request and the content falls under the category of “defamation of character.” In other words, the courts have said you have a “right to be forgotten.”

Enter England. A committee from the House of Lords verbally lashed out against the judgments, calling them “wrong” and “unreasonable.” Initially, many people thought that it was an emotional response to England getting knocked out of the group stage while fellow Europeans Germany, Belgium, Switzerland, Netherlands and Greece all made it out. But the comments didn’t stop.

“It is crystal clear that the neither the 1995 Directive, nor the CJEU’s interpretation of it reflects the incredible advancement in technology that we see today, over 20 years since the Directive was drafted,” said committee chairman Baroness Prashar.

The rest of England and the world had this response: “The House of Lords holds no power, other than the capitalist control it has been desperately clinging to since the Tudor Period. If we want figurehead statements we’ll talk to the Queen. Maybe you should run for parliament, but then again, that would go against the whole ‘work for nothing and just rely on inheritance’ philosophy from which your house was built.”

Until the judicial system completely collapses, looks like we’ll have to just respect real authority.

Leave a Reply

  • (will not be published)


4 + = twelve